Web Banner Tairawhiti

Kale looks tempting

14 May 2015

Kale looks tempting

There has been increased interest in the Kale, Chard and Stevia that has been planted along Gladstone Road and in the Fitzherbert Street roundabout as part of Council's winter street planting theme.
People have been asking if the plants are available for the public to pick and take home to eat.
"These are definitely the same type of veges you want to cook up for winter soups or even grow in your home garden,” says acting planning and development manager Geoff Canham.
“But it’s important to remember that plants that grow on the side of high-traffic roads like these have a good chance of being contaminated by chemical run-off from vehicles."
“These varieties were selected along with a combination of natives and exotic annuals to give an eye-catching texture and colour to the road islands and CBD planters,” says Mr Canham.
“They’re essentially demonstration plantings to trial for the ‘Our Place’ project that is looking to include edible gardens in public places elsewhere in the city.”
If you are interested in picking your own free fresh veges there are a range of community gardens run by local organisations in Gisborne and rural areas.
EIT Tairawhiti run a series of community garden activities throughout the district with community organisations like The Environment Centre, with the purpose to help residents in communities to get involved, learn about gardening and to share knowledge, seeds and kai.
A new intake of EIT Level 2 Rural Studies will be open in July offering students education in food growing basics that leads into Level 3 course in sustainable growing, organics, natural fertilisers and worm farming.
Locally grown Kale, Silverbeet and Chard and other seasonal veges are also available from the earlybird and farmers markets at good prices.
Council reminds people that food harvested from roadsides could potentially contain harmful contaminants and picking plants could also be a hazard for traffic.