Spraying banner image

Be careful spraying now it's spring

With the arrival of spring, Council will be checking growers are following the spraying rules so the health of our community and environment are protected.

Environmental Protection and Services director Helen Montgomery says springtime means lots of sprayers will be out, and it’s important the rules are followed.

“Agrichemical application is a permitted activity and as a Council we need to ensure sprays are used safely and responsibly by growers. Our Tairāwhiti Resource Management Plan (TRMP) lays out the rules for spraying both organic and conventional agrichemicals to keep our community safe,” says Ms Montgomery.

Some health risks linked to spray drift are asthma, watery eyes and skin rashes, as well as polluted waterways and harm to native wildlife.

“We know most growers out there follow the rules, which is great. But if the requirements of the TRMP aren’t followed, Council will consider enforcement action,” says Ms Montgomery.
Follow the checklist for both organic and conventional sprays when spraying:

  • Landowners and contractors are both responsible for spraying safely
  • Know the rules, such as taking extra care around boundaries or water
  • Use an experienced certified GROWSAFE® operator
  • Notify people and use signs where required
  • Take care spraying near sensitive areas and buffer zones
  • Have a property spray plan as required
  • Watch weather conditions and adapt as needed

For more information on spraying agrichemicals